j.s. edu tech.

Technological Training Resources


These posts present a selection of topics for educators or anyone looking to maximize available technology resources. Find information on doing efficient Internet searches, helpful hints about using Microsoft Word, and application of Google products for educators. 

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Recent Posts
  • Create Student Wiki Space With Google Sites, you can easily specify who has access to your site, but you can also give visitors different levels of access to parts of your site. For example ...
    Posted Dec 17, 2012, 8:27 PM by Julie Sharma
  • Getting Started with Google Sites Video on this topicGoogle Sites includes easy-to-use tools to help you put together your website.  To create your own free Google Site, sign into a Google (gmail ...
    Posted May 13, 2013, 4:22 PM by Julie Sharma
  • Getting a Conversation Going If you've implemented a Google Site as a part of your course, you might be interested in getting your students to discuss through the Google Sites forum.  Here are ...
    Posted Oct 14, 2012, 9:28 AM by Julie Sharma
  • Appointment Slots Note: Google is disabling the Appointment Slots feature through Google Calendar.  As of 11/4/2013, Google users will not be able to create new appointment slots; existing slots will ...
    Posted May 13, 2013, 6:54 PM by Julie Sharma
  • Educators' Website Template I've added another Class/Educators' Website Template.  Take a look!
    Posted Jun 26, 2012, 7:45 PM by Julie Sharma
Showing posts 1 - 5 of 11. View more »

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Create Student Wiki Space

posted Dec 17, 2012, 8:27 PM by Julie Sharma

With Google Sites, you can easily specify who has access to your site, but you can also give visitors different levels of access to parts of your site. For example, you can create a class website students can view with a page that functions as a student wiki space that students can edit.sharing permissions

First: Share Site Overall

  1. be sure you are signed in to your site at sites.google.com
  2. in the top right corner, click on  Share 
  3. in the Add People box (bottom), enter the email addresses of those you want to share the site with
  4. click on Can edit and, if you want those you added in step #3 to have only View access to the site, change to Can view 
  5. click Share and save

Second: Page-Level Permissions

  1. click on Enable page-level permissions
  2. in the pop-up, again click Enable page-level permissions 
    page level permissions
  3. in the page tree that appears on the left, click on the page you'd like to give site viewers a different level of access to, (in the image above, I select Announcements)
  4. to the right click on Change
  5. in the Permissions pop-up, select Use custom permissions
  6. click Save
  7. to the right of the users you'd like to change access for, click the drop down to (Can view in the image above), and select the appropriate level of access you'd like to give, perhaps Can edit 
  8. click Save changes

Remember that to add additional users, be sure to first add them to the site (see above, Share Site Overall) before changing page-level permissions for that person.

View Related Posts

Getting Started with Google Sites

posted Dec 17, 2012, 1:24 PM by Julie Sharma   [ updated May 13, 2013, 4:22 PM ]

Video on this topic

Google Sites includes easy-to-use tools to help you put together your website.  To create your own free Google Site, sign into a Google (gmail or Google Apps) account at sites.google.com.  Then, here are a few tricks to get you started with your first Google Site.

Test Website

If you've created any type of document, you know that the first version is never final. In fact, in some cases, you probably scratch entire documents and start over.  This is true for websites, too.  
However, when you create a website, you're "locating" it at a web address, which, if you delete the website and start over, can be difficult to reuse. Because of this, I suggest creating a test website and then, once you're happy with the set-up, copying that test site to make your real site. Here's how.

Templates

One of the first decisions to make when creating a new Google Site is which template, if any, you'd like to use.  While there are many helpful templates, if you don't want to use all the elements, pages, images, etc. from the template, it can be overwhelming clearing out the content you don't want.  Alternatively, if you simply would like the header images, colors, and fonts of a template, you can add those after you create a site. This way, you will be able to make use of a template's colors, fonts, and images without getting all the pages and page content.  Here's how.

Navigation

Once you've created your site, you'll be faced with one lone menu:. From this menu, it can be tricky to figure out how to modify the page content vs header, navigation, etc. To help clarify the various editing options, take a look at this how to.

Page Templates

To help organize your web pages, you can make use of Google's built-in page templates or create your own. The built-in page templates offer a blog-type page, file-storage page, list page, as well as basic web pages. Learn more about page template options.

Create a Go-to-page

If you use any of the special page types, you can bring highlights of the most recently posted items to one page, perhaps your homepage, thus making one go-to page where visitors can see a snapshot of recent entries.  This can be especially helpful for educators who want to make it easy for students to find updates on assignments, projects, class calendar and more at at glance.  Here's how.

Using Format and Colors/Fonts to Keep Consistent Format

When you edit a page, you have options to modify fonts, colors, and formatting by word or by section:edit toolbar
However, it can be better to change formatting at the site level to help keep format consistent between pages throughout your website.  Learn how.

Page Layout

When adding text, images, and gadgets to your website, you can use preset page layout options to keep your page organized.  Learn how.

Getting a Conversation Going

posted Oct 14, 2012, 9:23 AM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Oct 14, 2012, 9:28 AM ]

If you've implemented a Google Site as a part of your course, you might be interested in getting your students to discuss through the Google Sites forum.  Here are a few ideas on how to do this:
  • create (or request from your system administrator) a Google Group, which you can then embed in your site (see example); it can function like an Q&A forum.  You can even set a Google Group up in which you assign posts to certain students, thereby allowing students to take ownership of certain topics (learn more about this type of Google Group, called Collaborative Inbox).  Groups can also allow for moderation if you want to check over items before they are posted
  • Create one page (perhaps an announcements-style page) within your class website where students can edit/comment.  That is, you can give students access to edit one page but not all pages of a site, which is achieved using page-level permissions.  Announcements-style pages are great because whoever creates a post will be listed as the author, giving students as sense of responsibility and ownership.  You can then add a box listing recent posts, highlighting students contributions on another page of the class website.
  • Have students create their own websites, which you can add to the navigation of the class website.  Then students can easily navigate to visit their classmates' websites.
If you try any of these, share your experience with the group!

Appointment Slots

posted Oct 14, 2012, 8:55 AM by Julie Sharma   [ updated May 13, 2013, 6:54 PM ]

Note: Google is disabling the Appointment Slots feature through Google Calendar.  As of 11/4/2013, Google users will not be able to create new appointment slots; existing slots will work through 12/2013. However, Appointment Slots will remain for Google Apps users: more.  For alternatives, see here.

Do you find yourself needing to schedule students for presentation projects or office hours but always struggling with how best to do so?  If your school is on Google Apps for Education (or at least you and your students have Google accounts), you could really benefit from using Google Calendar appointment slots.  Here are the basics of how this works:
  1. select a block(s) of times (from day or week view) on your calendar and choose appointment slots
  2. add details to the event, including title, location, and any guests who will be present at all times (a TA, for example)
  3. save the event 
  4. share the appointment calendar link with your students
  5. students (need to be signed in with their Google account) click on the link and will see their own calendar items overlapped with the appointment times you created
  6. from there, students book the times that work best for them
  7. booked events are added to your Google Calendar
For more specifics on how to set up and use these, visit Using appointment slots

Educators' Website Template

posted Jun 26, 2012, 5:20 PM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jun 26, 2012, 7:45 PM ]

I've added another Class/Educators' Website Template.  Take a look!


Google Sites and RSS feed

posted Apr 4, 2012, 12:06 PM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:47 PM ]

If you use a Google Site with your class (or as an eportfolio option), you can choose to have an announcements-style page, which functions similarly to a blog and has a built-in RSS rss feed  Subscribe to posts link.

However, the announcements' page built-in "Subscribe to posts" option doesn't work for all visitors.  

But never fear; there are other ways to incorporate subscription options to allow access to more visitors! note: if you are creating a site through a Google Apps for Education or Business domain, your domain must have Feedburner enabled in order for this to work.

For more, visit this Google Sites How To on RSS feed subscription

Education Google Site Template

posted Apr 2, 2012, 8:16 AM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:49 PM ]

google
Educators are increasingly working to have an online presence either as the main class or a component part. However, the online environment can be a lot of work for educators and sometimes not supply the type of information students want.  Online environments that are at all cumbersome to navigate can deter students from getting the most out of tools provided there.  In many cases, students want an online homebase where they can get reminders or review important points for class.

To help educators meet these points, I have created a Google Sites website template that automatically puts information important to students in the spotlight. This template has
  • pages for 
    • assignments (teacher-created blog-style entries)
    • homework (customizable list of sortable items with name, due date, and description)
    • materials (list of teacher-uploaded files and/or website links)
    • syllabus in both in-page pdf and downloadable pdf
  • homepage with most recent, automatically updating items from
    • course calendar (just add events/due dates to a Google calendar for the class, and they automatically post on homepage)
    • assignments posts
    • homework list
    • materials
  • option to include a contact form
  • "subscribe to posts" option on assignments page for students to receive updates (with methods to use on all browsers)
  • search box with option to search website or the web
  • instructions for customizing 
Hopefully this template will give educators the power to easily create a dynamic online homebase for students to have access to the information they need most. 

Searching Video Captions

posted Apr 2, 2012, 7:39 AM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:50 PM ]

hulu
When you want to find audio content online, searches can be tricky to structure because it is hard to search audio content for keywords.

However, online video (and audio) content increasingly includes captions, which often times can be searched.

This video* explains how to use the video website Hulu.com to search for specific words or phrases in videos. The words/phrase might be in the title of the movie/show/episode or in the dialogue.

Hulu Captions Search allows you to 
  • find specific words or ideas in videos, rich content perfect for today's learners. 
  • learn about this is a powerful tool 
  • incorporate new, engaging content into classrooms, presentations, and more.  
When before you had to know what you were looking for to be able to find a video that used a certain word, phrase, or topic, now Hulu Captions Search makes finding this content manageable.  

*video requires flash

What to learn how I made the videos? Visit Jing for more Jing

Mastering Spell Check

posted Mar 25, 2012, 12:22 PM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:51 PM ]

spele check
Many typing programs--whether on a computer, tablet, or phone--have spelling help, which can be great but sometimes goes terribly wrong.  Avoid embarrassing spelling mistakes with help from this video, which focuses on spelling check tricks for Microsoft Word.

This video explains Microsoft Word Spell Check topics including:
  • Using Look up
  • Choosing the correct word from suggestions
  • Checking a word's meaning via synonyms  
(video requires flash to view)

Mastering Spell Check (wait for video to load)


What to learn how I made the videos? Visit Jing for more Jing

Google Search: Learning about Words

posted Mar 25, 2012, 12:01 PM by Julie Sharma   [ updated Jul 31, 2012, 7:55 PM ]

google
Once you have learned the basics of Google search, you can begin to use more advanced search features that will allow you to structure even more precise searches.  This video is especially helpful for language teachers/learners or those interested in learning about language and language usages through Google search.  

This video explains finding word groupings (word collocations): 
  • Google's dictionary search using define
  • Finding where to go online for examples of Standard English using Google News
  • Exploring word usage, collocations, and common word groupings (for example, learning to find which preposition comes after "interested" (answer: interested in)) by using wildcard (*) search 
(video requires flash to view)

Collocations (wait for video to load)

What to learn how I made the videos? Visit Jing for more Jing

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